Fortitude in an Era of Outrage and Victimhood

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post titled “Is the Western World Losing its Mind?”. I closed with the following conclusion: “We need to be a little more courageous and outspoken, even if it might be uncomfortable. If we don’t take the time to educate and learn from each other, we might lose what was given to us by our forefathers and all that we’ve taken for granted for so long.”


I was alluding to my concerns of the increased presence of deeply socialistic values and policies in western societies. I commented in the context of Bernie Sanders and some leftist German politicians.


However, the problem is not merely political. It runs deeper than that: it is rooted in a trend toward a culture and belief system that loves sensationalist, loud, and negative viewpoints. Increasingly, the West is losing sight of the basic values that have brought us into a time of unprecedented comfort, safety and fortune. We no longer seem to hold high the values of gratitude, humility, resilience and calm reason.


I was going to share some of my thoughts on the topic. However, someone else did a much better job at it than I ever could! Over the Easter weekend, I read a book titled “Fortitude, American Resilience in the Era of Outrage”. It was written by a young Texas Congressman and former Navy SEAL that I have been paying much attention to over the past few months, mostly on YouTube. I like the guy. He’s the kind of man I would like to see more in politics, in business and in our education system. I think you should take note of him too. Look him up on YouTube, or even better, read his book.

We all need to toughen up physically but even more importantly, mentally. We have become much too thin-skinned. And, we are much too quick to our emotional and defensive responses. FORTITUDE is a no-nonsense advice book for finding the strength to deal with everything from menial daily frustrations to truly difficult challenges. More than that, it is a roadmap for a more resilient perspective and culture.


Crenshaw’s message is timely, important and accessible. My children are 26, 24 and 20 years of age. All of them will have a copy of this book soon, and we will be discussing the core messages. I urge you to read this book as well and to share it. This is a message we need to cherish and take to heart. The book is written by a guy that is credible and has a story to back it all up.